Tag Archives: science fiction reviews

Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Rating: Epic Dragon

Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Let me start by saying, “Wow.” I will follow that up by saying, “Holy crap and just, wow again.” What an awesome book. I have not sat down to a novel that compelled me to finish it in less than a day for years. I just don’t read novels like that anymore. I read them for two hours here and three hours there during the week, spending other reading time on articles, marketing stuff, or various research content. Add in reading my own writing for revisions, and, well, I just don’t crank out a book a day like I used to.

But I did with this one. (Just look how long it’s been since I posted the last review—one day!) Continue reading Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Book Review: Hyperion, by Dan Simmons

Rating: Grumbling Gargoyle

Book Review: Hyperion, by Dan Simmons

This book was tough for me. I had a really hard time getting into it, and actually stopped twice during the first hundred and thirty pages and read other books (one is the last review I did, the other was Of Mice and Men, which I was tempted to review, but decided not to because everyone already knows that book is amazing anyway). All that said, I think in ways, Dan Simmons’ Hyperion is a beautiful book. I think the writing is wonderful. It’s just that the story started slow for me. And the ending, well, let’s just say the last two pages were so completely unsatisfying I can hardly articulate how vexed I was. Continue reading Book Review: Hyperion, by Dan Simmons

Book Review: The Tube Riders, by Chris Ward

Rating: Center Centaur

Book Review: The Tube Riders, by Chris Ward

The Tube Riders is a near-future novel set in a fictitious Great Britain that has been cordoned off from the rest of the world by a corrupt government for purposes of achieving the powerful Governor’s secret agenda (which eventually you do get to find out, but I’m not going to tell).

The story revolves around a group of youngsters who have bonded around a hobby, tube riding, which provides them with an adrenaline rush and with a diversion from the plight of their hard lives, but even more important, tube riding gives them an identity: they are the Tube Riders. Tube riding allows them to find a sense of family, and, in their own small way, to fight back against the system that has denied them opportunities to do more than find abstract diversions like, well, tube riding. However, fighting back doesn’t stay “in their own small way” for long. Continue reading Book Review: The Tube Riders, by Chris Ward