Rift in the Races Progress Update: September

Rift in the Races is now with my editor, and I have begun working on the third book (so that the wait between book 2 and book 3 won’t be anywhere near as long as the time between 1 and 2). My editor says she can have it back to me in eight weeks, which, from the time I gave it to her, puts that around November 9th. I will be getting chunks of her suggestions back and working through them as she goes, so I can actually be done with her revisions at almost the same time she is done making them, or within a few days. So, in theory, I’ll have an edited copy of the manuscript done by let’s say November 12th or, just for reality’s sake, let’s call it the 15th. Continue reading Rift in the Races Progress Update: September

Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Rating: Epic Dragon

Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Let me start by saying, “Wow.” I will follow that up by saying, “Holy crap and just, wow again.” What an awesome book. I have not sat down to a novel that compelled me to finish it in less than a day for years. I just don’t read novels like that anymore. I read them for two hours here and three hours there during the week, spending other reading time on articles, marketing stuff, or various research content. Add in reading my own writing for revisions, and, well, I just don’t crank out a book a day like I used to.

But I did with this one. (Just look how long it’s been since I posted the last review—one day!) Continue reading Book Review: The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

Book Review: Unnatural Selection, by Thomas Pryce

Rating: Center Centaur

Book Review: Unnatural Selection, by Thomas Pryce

This book has some of the best, most entertaining and even-laugh-out loud similes I’ve read in a long, long time. Thomas Pryce is a guy who has such a deft voice and a broad reach when it comes to comparative statements, I found myself completely envious. There’s so many it’s hard to pick even just one to show, but I’ll go with this one, since I think I liked it best, and I don’t think it will ruin anything for you:

Even more telling, the other dog had stopped barking, and now circled sheepishly, its tail pinned tightly between its legs. You’d think it’d just seen the K-9 equivalent of a ghost, an apparition of Michael Vick holding jumper cables perhaps.

That’s just one out of many. Many! I read through this book and just kept getting these little hits of joy from that sort of stuff, and it was from that stuff that I found my main enjoyment of the novel. Continue reading Book Review: Unnatural Selection, by Thomas Pryce

How to Finish Writing Your Novel: The Power of Scoreboards

I get asked “how I do it?” when people find out I write novels. And these aren’t just random people asking, people who can’t imagine writing six hundred or nine hundred page books because they hated writing essays in high school or college, these are writers who ask. I hang out on a number of writer forums and social media groups, and there are many really amazing, creative talents out there who want to write a novel, but they can’t seem to do it. These are the kinds of folks who try NaNoWriMo every so often, but never make it through—or they do make it through, but the novel isn’t done at the end, so, it sort of languishes and dies on their hard drive. It’s frustrating, and discouraging. But I think it’s because most people skip an essential tool: the scoreboard. Continue reading How to Finish Writing Your Novel: The Power of Scoreboards

Book Review: On Canaan’s Side, by Sebastian Barry

Rating: Hot Princess

Book Review: On Canaan’s Side, by Sebastian Barry

I have to say, when I first saw this book (I was given it as a gift by a friend), I looked at the cover and thought, Oh crap. This is going to suck. Without repeating tired book cover clichés, I was wrong. On Canaan’s Side, by Sebastian Barry is an absolutely gorgeous book. The prose are beautiful, fluid and visual. Barry absolutely makes language stand up and march about, and he compels it to do his will with a facility that approaches greatness. It might even be great, although 1) I’m not sure I’m qualified to determine such things, and 2) the story itself was a bit of a downer, so I think I may have lost some love on that count. But downer or not, this is what good writing looks like, and I always enjoy watching someone at work who has such a wonderful command of language. Continue reading Book Review: On Canaan’s Side, by Sebastian Barry